Microsoft Can No Longer Sell Word (well from October)

Discussion topics, Linux related - not requests for help

Moderators: ChrisThornett, LXF moderators

Microsoft Can No Longer Sell Word (well from October)

Postby LeeNukes » Wed Aug 12, 2009 8:06 pm

Source http://blogs.computerworld.com/14532/microsoft_banned_from_selling_word

Microsoft had been sued by i4i, a collaborative content solution and technology company....

On May 20th 2009, Judge Davis and his court's jury ruled that Microsoft owed i4i a $200 million patent infringement verdict for having infringed on i4i's "A system and method for the separate manipulation of the architecture and content of a document, particularly for data representation and transformations,"...

Microsoft didn't settle.

on August 11, he signed the order that blocks Microsoft from selling Word. According to the document, "This injunction becomes effective 60 days from the date of this order." So, on or about October 12th, Word, and Microsoft Office since all versions contain it, will go off store shelves.



:shock:
User avatar
LeeNukes
LXF regular
 
Posts: 954
Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 8:11 pm
Location: At the bar

Postby towy71 » Wed Aug 12, 2009 8:21 pm

Aye but the pirate versions will circulate for years :evil:

Mind you the final sentence of the article is pertinent:
U.S. patent law and enforcement has become a disgrace, and each such 'victory' drives up the cost of technology for all of us and makes real innovation ever harder to achieve.


Who is the worst patent bandit?
Microsoft Corp. has reached a patenting milestone by logging its 5,000th patent granted in the United States.
That is from one of their own websites :roll:

A pox on all their houses
Last edited by towy71 on Wed Aug 12, 2009 8:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
still looking for that door into summer
User avatar
towy71
Moderator
 
Posts: 4264
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2005 2:11 pm
Location: wild West Wales

Postby Rhakios » Wed Aug 12, 2009 8:22 pm

And do any other office suites or word processors infringe this patent?
Bye, Rhakios
User avatar
Rhakios
Moderator
 
Posts: 7634
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2005 11:18 pm
Location: Midlands, UK

Postby towy71 » Wed Aug 12, 2009 8:32 pm

Rhakios wrote:And do any other office suites or word processors infringe this patent?

Only in the US, probably ;-)
still looking for that door into summer
User avatar
towy71
Moderator
 
Posts: 4264
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2005 2:11 pm
Location: wild West Wales

Postby LeeNukes » Wed Aug 12, 2009 10:21 pm

I thought IBM was the biggest Patent bitch.
User avatar
LeeNukes
LXF regular
 
Posts: 954
Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 8:11 pm
Location: At the bar

Postby nordle » Wed Aug 12, 2009 10:29 pm

Microsoft Corp. has reached a patenting milestone by logging its 5,000th patent granted in the United States.


Really, that seems amazingly low. 500,000 is surely nearer the mark.
I think, therefore I compile
User avatar
nordle
LXF regular
 
Posts: 1500
Joined: Fri Apr 08, 2005 9:56 pm

Postby johnhudson » Thu Aug 13, 2009 8:08 am

I tried to find more details about the alleged infringement and it appears there may be prior art in WordStar which allowed you create and manipulate description files separately from content files. But then MS would never want to admit that it had borrowed something from WordStar.
johnhudson
LXF regular
 
Posts: 881
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2005 1:37 pm

Postby AndyBaxman » Thu Aug 13, 2009 8:31 am

johnhudson wrote:I tried to find more details about the alleged infringement and it appears there may be prior art in WordStar which allowed you create and manipulate description files separately from content files. But then MS would never want to admit that it had borrowed something from WordStar.


It relates to MS's XML document formats. IIRC something to do with the ability to self-define an XML schema within the document. A company called i4i, apparently, patented it.

So not in WordStar, WordPerfect, etc, though Open Office uses XML documents.

Wouldn't it be ironic if OO came to MS's rescue?!
Bomb #20: "Let there be light"
User avatar
AndyBaxman
LXF regular
 
Posts: 523
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 8:47 am

Postby linuxgirlie » Thu Aug 13, 2009 9:03 am

Shame it's not in the UK, what an easy way to get schools to convert to OpenOffice 8)
My knowledge comes with no warranty...........

Server operating system designed for schools:http://www.linuxschools.com
linuxgirlie
LXF regular
 
Posts: 787
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 6:34 pm
Location: Kent...UK

Postby Dutch_Master » Thu Aug 13, 2009 11:44 am

It would, woundn't it? 8) But it's still usable though: send schools a letter stating that M$ lost in court and either abandon Word or change it significantly beyond compatability with older versions and that you're authorised to offer them a free alternative. And while they're at it, you can also offer them an Open Source school-IT environment ;) In other words (pun intended :P): beat M$ with their own weapons: FUD :roll:
Dutch_Master
LXF regular
 
Posts: 2453
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 1:49 am

Postby donoreo » Thu Aug 13, 2009 1:03 pm

I just want to say, it is a Canadian company that won this, so far. Front page news here on the Toronto Star today.
I cannot deny anything that I did not say.
User avatar
donoreo
LXF regular
 
Posts: 788
Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2005 1:49 pm
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Postby guy » Thu Aug 13, 2009 9:12 pm

towy71 wrote:A pox on all their houses


Then help end software patents - give us a hand at swpat.org.

Meanwhile, the Groklaw article makes interesting reading. Microsoft do seem to have been badly bitten by the very patent system they have fought so hard to sustain. (Though I'm not taking bets that Microsoft really will be forced to cripple Word's native OOXML format).

Please complete the following lame joke:
"'i4i' stands for 'irony for i....'"
Cheers,
Guy
The eternal help vampire
User avatar
guy
LXF regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2005 12:07 pm
Location: Worcestershire

Postby ollie » Fri Aug 14, 2009 11:37 am

The patent is an old one having been filed in 1994 and issued in 1998, so it may have an impact on OpenOffice.org Writer.

Honestly, I think it will be overturned because of the W3C's HTML and CSS being published about the same time but it might be the catalyst that makes the EU reject software patents once and for all.
User avatar
ollie
Moderator
 
Posts: 2749
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2005 11:26 am
Location: Bathurst NSW Australia

Postby towy71 » Fri Aug 14, 2009 11:57 am

guy wrote:
towy71 wrote:Please complete the following lame joke:
"'i4i' stands for 'irony for i....'"
Ignoramuses :lol:
still looking for that door into summer
User avatar
towy71
Moderator
 
Posts: 4264
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2005 2:11 pm
Location: wild West Wales

Postby guy » Sat Aug 15, 2009 7:14 pm

ollie wrote:The patent is an old one having been filed in 1994 and issued in 1998, so it may have an impact on OpenOffice.org Writer.

Writer's native ODF doesn't infringe the patent in the same way that Word's proprietary (non-open) extensions to OOXML do. ISTR that Writer does not even implement the violating extension in its OOXML I/O filters, because it is not open. In which case OOo gets off scott free. :)
Cheers,
Guy
The eternal help vampire
User avatar
guy
LXF regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2005 12:07 pm
Location: Worcestershire


Return to Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest