Editing GPARTED

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Editing GPARTED

Postby chris » Thu Feb 27, 2014 10:27 am

Hi,

I use GPARTED for creating or changing partitions on my hard discs and find it easy to use and very useful. However there is one thing I would be grateful for some help with: What file should I edit in order to make the localle default to English instead of defaulting to American? I am assuming that this can be changed because if it 'defaults' to American one would expect to be able to make it 'default' to whatever one wants. Presumably it is possible to change all the default settings if one wants to and have it run automatically with the user's chosen settings?
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Postby purplepenguin » Thu Feb 27, 2014 12:54 pm

Do you running it from an installed or live distro?

I would have expected it to pick up on the system settings.
So it looks like I'm back to LinuxMint again. Why you ask? Because my machine smell nicer.

I'm not too sure I'd want a Mint and Cinnamon muffin with my brew though. Guess I'm lucky they don't run my local bakery.
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Postby chris » Thu Feb 27, 2014 2:38 pm

I unzipped the file that I downloaded straight on to a USB memory stick - I forgot to mention that that is how I use Gparted so it is presumably a live USB stick.

I found before that when it was on installed on my hard disc it took ages and ages to run, so it is better for several reasons to use it on a memory stick

I also can't get it to connect to my WiFi network
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Postby johnhudson » Thu Feb 27, 2014 10:21 pm

If you mean that you have downloaded the iso and put it on a USB stick, then you cannot change the default language because it is a system tool and they are all US English.

If you run it from within your distro, then your distro may provide a GUI which uses the locale language.
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Postby purplepenguin » Thu Feb 27, 2014 10:42 pm

Does it run in an OS or is it just a portable application that runs off usb? I'm a little confused as I've never seen a live image that you just unzip and run. Normally live images need to be installed to usb by using something like Unetbootin or startup disk creator etc.

As far as I remember Gparted live uses Debian as it's distro. If you can get to a terminal you can check the system locale with

Code: Select all
locale


Code: Select all
locale -a

Will give a list of all available languages on the system.

As for networking (wired at least) needs to be activated befor it can be used. Click the networking icon on the desktop and you can set up static or DHCP. As for wireless you may need to install drivers for the card, to be honest I don't know as I generally use wired. Try setting up networking and run the command

Code: Select all
ifconfig -a

to see if a there is a wireless interface.
So it looks like I'm back to LinuxMint again. Why you ask? Because my machine smell nicer.

I'm not too sure I'd want a Mint and Cinnamon muffin with my brew though. Guess I'm lucky they don't run my local bakery.
purplepenguin
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Postby chris » Fri Feb 28, 2014 9:55 am

Hi
It runs as a live program. I plug the memory stick into a USB port, switch on the computer, press F8 until I get boot menu and then select the USB memory stick to boot from and then it boots and produces the Gparted desktop as well as offering a terminal and a browser when I close the Gparted window.

When I selected the terminal and did 'locale -a'

I got:-
'c
c.utf8
en_GB.utf8
en_us.utf8
POSIX'

When I did 'ifconfig -a'

it appeared to be aware of my WiFi card because it produced:-

wlan0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:if:44:44:71

It also mentioned eth0 and the HWaddr was different


I followed the instructions on the Gparted web site for putting Gparted onto a USB memory stick and chose method B (the manual method) and it seems to work fine.
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Postby Rhakios » Fri Feb 28, 2014 11:13 am

The boot medium is not an application, it's a Debian derived live distro. looking at one of the packages.txt files on Sourceforge, I see that it does have dpkg installed, so it would be possible to get more packages containing the right locales (in the release notes, I see it's sid). However you'd need to know what repos to use and remaster the thing to make changes permanent.
I'm sure there are tools for remastering Debian derived distros, perhaps someone else can tell you all about them.
Bye, Rhakios
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Postby purplepenguin » Fri Feb 28, 2014 10:19 pm

Hi Chris

You cannot boot a program/application. You boot an operating system/distro to which the program has been installed.

This is starting to look like an awful lot of work for you. as Rhakios pointed out you will need to remaster the live distro/OS to your liking. It's not impossible but before you embark on such a project I'd ask is it really worth is? How often do you use it and for how long each time? How much effort do you want to put in?

If you answered yes or just want to give it ago for learning sake. Then there are a couple of options to look at.

1. boot the live image and fire up the terminal. (I doubt there's a gui package manager on it). Look for something called remastersys in the repos with
Code: Select all
aptitude search remastersys

If it's in the repo read up on how to use it and away you go. Note that Remastersys is not currently under development but an older version may still be in the Sid repo. According to http://www.debgen.simplylinux.ch there is a repo. You could try adding
Code: Select all
#Third Parties Repos
#Remastersys
http://www.remastersys.com/repository squeeze/
to the sources.list and searching again.

2. Download a Ubuntu iso. use something like startup disk creator or Unetbootin to create a bootable USB drive with a persistent storage area. Boot it, install Gparted and configure the locale as you wish.

3. SuSe Studio lets you create a live distro in the browser.

4. There are other options but I think that's enough for now.

Let us know what you decide to do and if you need any more help just ask.

PP
So it looks like I'm back to LinuxMint again. Why you ask? Because my machine smell nicer.

I'm not too sure I'd want a Mint and Cinnamon muffin with my brew though. Guess I'm lucky they don't run my local bakery.
purplepenguin
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Posts: 133
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2011 2:19 pm
Location: Blissfully at the Command Line

Postby purplepenguin » Fri Feb 28, 2014 11:27 pm

[quote="chris"]
When I selected the terminal and did
Code: Select all
locale -a

I got:-
Code: Select all
'c
c.utf8
en_GB.utf8
en_us.utf8
POSIX'

/quote]

So isthe locale you want there?

Code: Select all
export LANG=en_GB.UTF-8
So it looks like I'm back to LinuxMint again. Why you ask? Because my machine smell nicer.

I'm not too sure I'd want a Mint and Cinnamon muffin with my brew though. Guess I'm lucky they don't run my local bakery.
purplepenguin
LXF regular
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2011 2:19 pm
Location: Blissfully at the Command Line


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